New Study Shows Distracted Driving Is Not Just a Teen Problem

A study published earlier this month by the Pew Internet & American Life Project documents what many of us probably knew in our hearts: distracted driving is more than just a teen problem. Following up the Project’s 2009 study of teens and distracted driving, the new report finds that “one in four American adults say they have texted while driving”. In fact, the proportion for adults who acknowledge having engaged in this especially dangerous activity – 27% – is basically the same as the percentage of teens – 26% – who acknowledge doing so.

Perhaps more shocking is the fact that 17% of all adults acknowledge having been so distracted “while talking or texting that they have physically bumped into another person or object” while behind the wheel.

As I have noted in a number of previous posts on Portland distracted driving, Oregon is one of a growing number of states that are attempting to crack down on the practice through legislation. With a small number of exceptions, Oregon distracted driving became illegal throughout the state at the beginning of this year. In a society where, according to the study, 82% of Americans over age 18 now own a cellphone and 58% of them text, distracted driving is likely to continue growing as an issue.

Portland, Salem, Medford and Eugene distracted driving all pose a danger to everyone on the road. While the practice is now illegal here in Oregon it would be naïve to believe that it has stopped. If you or a loved one have been in an accident involving an Oregon distracted driver it is important that you seek the advice and assistance of a Portland distracted driving lawyer as soon as possible. An Oregon personal injury attorney with a specialty in distracted driving can offer essential advice on the best way to protect your rights and receive the justice you deserve if you have been injured as a result of someone else’s irresponsible behavior behind the wheel.

The Money Times: Adults equally guilty of texting, talking as teens – study

Pew Internet & American Life Project – Adults and Cell Phone Distractions